eL Seed - The Bridge

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  @t.jchoe

Photo: @t.jchoe

Great art installation by eL Seed in the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea. Initially he wanted to create a bridge-like sculpture rising about 20 metres, based on the idea of unity, peace and mutual respect. But due to security issues, this couldn’t be realized, so the result is this laser-cut horizontal artwork at the fence of the DMZ.

Describing the project, eL Seed wrote: 

‘Bridges are never built from one side. It involves taking a step forward from both sides. I proposed a bridge that would begin in South Korea and extend to the mid-point a gesture of solidarity. The project will remain unfinished until another art piece is installed in North Korea, thus making it the ultimate symbol of unification. 'The Bridge' feeds the memories of the older generations with the souvenir of one united country, it stands as a reminder for the younger generations that there is a shared culture, language, and traditions and that art can bring people, culture and generations together beyond political conflict.’

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  @t.jchoe

Photo: @t.jchoe

The artwork translates the words of a poem, via eL Seed's  'calligraffiti', by Kim Sowol, a North Korean poet who passed away before the country was divided:

You may remember, unable to forget:
yet live a lifetime, remember or forget, 
For you will have a day when you will come to forget.

You may remember, unable to forget:
Let your years flow by, remember or forget, 
For once in a while, you will forget.

On the other hand it may be:
How could you forget
What you can never forget?